a.m.r.l.


"The Phantom Of The Opera" (1925)

"The Phantom Of The Opera" (1925)

(Source: the-dark-city, via kat-blaque)

thelonelyztoner:

black—lamb:

ccushty:

punkgender:

one of the worst things about becoming educated on social issues is when people are like ‘you used to have a sense of humor’

no i used to have internalized prejudices which i’ve worked really hard to overcome and i realize now that your jokes are shitty

Always reblog this because becoming more socially aware makes you dislike a lot of people

This is why I don’t have friends anymore

(via chescaleigh)

The more we learn about ourselves we change what we can and consequently, we learn to accept and cherish ourselves.

The more we learn about ourselves we change what we can and consequently, we learn to accept and cherish ourselves.

chescaleigh:


The 10 Phrases I’ve Stopped Saying And The People Who Appreciate Me For It (via Upworthy)
It’s pretty common for people to use disability metaphors like “That guy is crazy!” or “This weather is so bipolar” without giving it a second thought. It’s important to realize how these words and metaphors can affect people with disabilities and perpetuate stigmas surrounding mental health. If you’ve never thought about the impact these words can have, you’re in luck because this chart provides some common disability metaphors and easy alternatives!

ps. Special thanks to m-arkiplier for inspiring me to create this graphic! (and for his permission to use his post) For more info on why it’s important to be conscious of the metaphors we use, check out this HuffPost article ”10 Reasons to Give Up Ableist Language.”

This is so important.

chescaleigh:

The 10 Phrases I’ve Stopped Saying And The People Who Appreciate Me For It (via Upworthy)

It’s pretty common for people to use disability metaphors like “That guy is crazy!” or “This weather is so bipolar” without giving it a second thought. It’s important to realize how these words and metaphors can affect people with disabilities and perpetuate stigmas surrounding mental health. If you’ve never thought about the impact these words can have, you’re in luck because this chart provides some common disability metaphors and easy alternatives!

ps. Special thanks to m-arkiplier for inspiring me to create this graphic! (and for his permission to use his post) For more info on why it’s important to be conscious of the metaphors we use, check out this HuffPost article ”10 Reasons to Give Up Ableist Language.”


This is so important.